Skip to main content

Residential landowners

Thinking of subdividing your property?

Thinking of subdividing your property?

Under the right circumstances, subdividing a section can be very successful when advice is sought early; this saves money and avoids delays, as it can be a complex process. In the meantime - whether your current section is too big, has been rezoned or you have a large greenfield site you’re considering developing - here are some important things to know as you prepare to subdivide.

Learn more
Can I subdivide?

Can I subdivide?

Subdividing land is the process of multiplying the number of titles that can be owned and constructed on, essentially creating two or more sections from one original allotment. For a property to be subdividable, you must first meet the requirements of your local council’s district plan. Specific to your region, district plans include the different planning controls and development standards that regulate things like the minimum size of a section, maximum sizes of buildings and their positions in relation to boundaries, vehicle access (driveways) and parking requirements.

Find out if your site is feasible

Types of subdivision

Unit title

Creates individual titles to units, apartments or dwellings that occupy one single piece of land known as a ‘principal unit’. These kinds of subdivisions require a body corporate to manage common facilities such as driveways, stairwells and foyers.

Learn more

Cross-leases

Less desirable, but similar to unit titles in that ownership over the household unit is determined by the title, but the remainder of the section and/or common areas are held by a number of people.

Learn more

Fee simple

What most people are familiar with and subsequently the most common. It creates one or more additional sections from an existing parcel of land and new titles to go with them.

Who can help me subdivide?

Who can help me subdivide?

To begin the application process, talk to our planners and/or surveyors. A surveyor will start by measuring your property to prepare a plan that will be part of your application to the council for consent, and planners will use that plan when they help you through the application process that involves meeting all the regulations set by your council.

Should the need for servicing arise, you may need to bring in engineer as well, but by choosing to work with Baseline Group you have access to all these services, great advice and a competitive fee with no surprises. As experts in developments large and small, we’re able to calculate the entire cost and walk you through the process so that you’re well informed from the start.

Contact us

Other services you may needs us for

  • Topographical surveys

    No land is flat so before anything begins in your residential land development you need a topographical survey. This informs your architect and engineer of site levels, trees, fences, other buildings and boundaries, etc. Absolutely everything is built upon this and if it isn’t correct it can be very expensive, complicated and time-consuming to rectify later on.

    Learn more
  • Boundary surveys

    Knowing who owns which piece of land is an important and complex thing. Even so, you’d be surprised how often boundary checks are neglected before buildings are designed, land is sold or fences are built. A redefinition survey may be required to locate the legal boundaries of your property for any of these reasons. A survey can help avoid expensive encroachment disputes and ill-will between neighbours.

    Learn more
  • Residential engineering

    To get your project through the consent process successfully Council need to see a plan for how you propose to deal with stormwater and waste water, getting power and telephone to your site, vehicle entranceways and other access points. Having a plan also allows you to tender the work for the best price.

    Learn more
  • Engineered access ways

    These are quite different to building consent access ways, which often don’t meet requirements because they fail to meet the infrastructure standard. Strength of the pavement needed. Novices and even some professionals often don’t know or understand the strength a pavement requires. That’s where an engineer can save you time, cost and the hassle involved with doing something twice.

Blog articles

Why we have such complicated septic tank disposal rules

Why we have such complicated septic tank disposal rules

When extending a dwelling in the rural environment and you don’t have access to council sewer, it’s important to be aware of the potential issues you are uncovering. Find out what you should consider for your septic tank to meet the standards

Learn more
Is the RMA really the problem?

Is the RMA really the problem?

For years we have heard the issue that development gets held up because of resource consents and this adds significant costs and delays to development. Is the RMA to blame for this or is it the way developers and councils work together to achieve positive planning outcomes?

Learn more
Buildings under exemptions may still need resource consent

Buildings under exemptions may still need resource consent

Recently Government announced exemptions to the Building Act which mean building consents may no longer be required for small builds. Before you rush out to buy building materials be aware that the devil is in the detail.

Learn more
Cross lease titles - an overview

Cross lease titles - an overview

Find out more about the ins and outs of cross-leases and how ownership over a household unit is determined by the title.

Learn more
The importance of knowing your boundaries

The importance of knowing your boundaries

Land is an important asset and discussions with neighbours over where the boundary lies between properties can occasionally be problematic. This is particularly relevant if your land contains trees, good grazing land, streams,rivers or a coastal margin. It’s helpful to know your rights and obligations when it comes to property boundaries.

Learn more
Minimum car parking requirements to be chopped from new urban developments

Minimum car parking requirements to be chopped from new urban developments

Car parking requirements change for new urban developments are due to be on the chopping block within 18 months under new planning provisions.

Learn more
Rural allotment sizes set to double in West Selwyn rural zones

Rural allotment sizes set to double in West Selwyn rural zones

With new changes being made to planning provisions in the Selwyn District, see how the minimum allotment sizes increase for rural subdivisions in the western part of the Selwyn District.

Learn more